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Home > Main > Why Local Promoters Love and Hate A Cappella Groups

Why Local Promoters Love and Hate A Cappella Groups

by Florian Städtler
March 11, 2010

There’s one basic mistake almost everybody who wants to get out to be heard by the public tends to make: Concentrating on oneself. Companies, entrepreneurs, marketing professionals and – it goes without saying – also musicians and their agents make this mistake all the time. They think about their image, their product, their service first. They talk (or even shout) about it all the time, instead of taking the time to use a strategy, that is much more effective to reach any target group:

Learn to think from the customer’s perspective by learning as much as possible about what your customer really loves (and hates).

What does that mean for vocal groups searching for local promoters to book them for concerts? Very easy: Imagine you were in the promoter’s shoes. To give you an impression how you could start getting less self-centered and more promoter-oriented we at SpielPlanVier put together a list of why promoters love and hate vocal and a cappella groups.

Don’t take the list and its content 100% seriously. But do so concerning the golden thread of this post: Try to see things from your customers’ perspective – and you will have much better conversations with your music business contacts.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because they are eccentric niche artists on the music market.

Promoters love a cappella groups, because they usually don’t need expensive technical equipment.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because female audiences drink way too little.

Promoters love a cappella groups, when they have reached a cult status in their town.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because they don’t have enough media presence.

Promoters love a cappella groups, because it’s easy for them to do radio interviews and mini-showcases including live singing and beatboxing.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because they don’t know that contemporary a cappella is more than Barbershop and Comedian Harmonists.

Promoters love a cappella groups, because they can travel in a mini-van and drive themselves, which means low travel costs.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because they won’t hang around at the bar until three in the morning.

Promoters love a cappella groups, because they will hang around at the bar and drink on in their hotel rooms with the promoter until the break of dawn.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, that desperately try to be funny and fail to do so.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, who force themselves to do choreography and dancing although this makes them look like lurching idiots.

Promoters love a cappella groups no matter how good they sing as long as their audience loves the jokes in between the songs and the hilarious lyrics.

Promoters love a cappella groups, because they cannot eat much before the show.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because they are extremely hungry and need a warm meal after the show (most probably around 11:30 pm).

Promoters love a cappella groups, because they usually don’t need a 5-hour soundcheck.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because singers (unlike rock drummers) are wimps, who cancel shows, just because they’ve caught a cold and listen to their doctor.

Promoters love a cappella groups, because many of them sound very similar, so that if some softish singer cancels a show, it’s very easy to find another vocal group to jump in without the audience making a big fuss.

Promoters hate a cappella groups, because building up an a cappella audience might mean work.

Promoters love a cappella groups, because after having built an a cappella audience, these fans will be very reliable and enthusiastic.

Promoters love a cappella groups, if they have 50.000 + email addresses of die-hard fans which garantuee a sold out show even on the day of the World Cup final.

I’m more than sure that you – being a promoter, a singer or an agent – can find dozens of reasons more. Looking forward to why you love and/or hate vocal and a cappella groups :-). I want your comments right here, let it roll!

Did you like this article? Do you agree or (even better) disagree? We want you to let us know, so feel free to post your comments. If you want to share ideas with more a cappella and vocal activists and recommend the site via facebook, twitter or at your blog – thank you!

Do you think there are groups or people who should be featured in the Vocal Blog interview series? Do you want to interview someone for Vocal Blog? Guest posts can be submitted to info@vocal-blog.net, we look forward to your contributions.

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  1. 23. März 2010, 21:04 | #1

    Very enlightening, and amusing. Thank you!

  2. 23. März 2010, 21:58 | #2

    Thanks, Colleen.
    You could probably add a few love & hate reasons?
    C’mon, let’s hear your favourite aca-clichés!

  3. 10. Mai 2010, 20:49 | #3

    We need a promoter and gigs.

  4. 17. Mai 2010, 17:32 | #4

    Hi Peter, thanks for your message and the
    link to Vocal Motion Six. How about checking out the
    leading German database for vocal and a cappella music
    http://www.acappella-online.de. There’s a list of groups and
    and agents which might help you to find representation.

    Also a good link is http://www.kulturboerse.de, the no. 1 cultural
    trade fair, which has a music stage and some interesting
    agents present every January.

    There might be another idea: How about posting a story about
    you and your group’s history on the Vocal Blog? I love guest
    authors with an interesting story (no advertising, please) about
    the things that interest the vocal and a cappella scene around
    the world.

    Good luck, hope I could help you.

    Best wishes

    FSt
    Florian Städtler

  1. 22. März 2010, 14:30 | #1
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