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Artikel Tagged ‘CASA’

My SoJam Highlights as a First Timer

by Deborah Rosanwo, originally posted on www.europeanvoices.org on November 12th 2013

Deborah Rosanwo

When I said that I was going to SoJam the reactions ranged from” Nice, what is that?” to “All that way for a weekend of A cappella…On your own???”

It is actually Twitter’s fault. Whilst following Vocal Blog I got caught up in an onslaught of overwhelming enthusiastic Tweets from SoJam 2011. Those who know me know that I can also be enthusiastic about things a cappella but this was a completely new dimension and it made me curious to see what the hype was about. The seed for my trip was planted.

As fate would have it, I was in for 6 weeks of hardcore a cappella from September on filled with Choir competitions, the Bonner Jazzchor “Bottle This Moment” CD Release Tour and culminating in SoJam.

So was it worth it? Definitely! Here are my personal highlights:

1) Finally meeting dear Facebook and Twitter friends – Tone Siwela and Tara Marie Ahn - a Cyber SoJam “like”Story. I struck up a great a cappella -based friendship with both of them because of their effervescent 2011 SoJam Tweets and meeting them in person was like a reunion of dear old friends.

P12007692) The Pre- SoJam Meeting in Jimmy V’s with CAL Founder Tom Keyes, the a Cappella Recording Guru Bill Hare, Mr. Vocal Blog himself Florian Städtler, the CASA Ambassador for Ohio and Africa Tone Siwela and Myself …Aca Nerd.  Learning first hand about the history and purpose of The Contemporary A Cappella League and discussing the regional benefits as well as the international relevance.. Extremely informative…especially when interspersed with travelers anecdotes!

3) Chucks! This is THE Burger Temple of Raleigh. Try a Dirty South with Sea Island Red Pea Chili, crispy tobacco onions and Ashe County Mountain Cheddar. The owner won’t hesitate to explain where all the ingredients are bred or grown. Delicious!

4) What does an A Cappella ensemble from Singapore do when it realizes that a great fan cannot come to it’s concert because he can’t close his Chinese restaurant? A flashmob of course! MICappella sang a beautiful contemporary Chinese song after ordering their food.. Much to the joy of the restaurant owner and astonishment of the customers. Extremely cool!

5) UCD MIX. I was excited about the collegiate a cappella competition. I had heard all sorts of things varying from” if you like Beatbox CPR and Octavers ” to ” you can’t beat the enthusiasm of these youngsters”…all of which proved to be true! The ones that stood out that night were however MIX from the University of Denver. They were innovative, had strong soloists, edgy and still the perfect blend, fantastic drama in their choreography and told the story. They practically goldfished me. I could have seen them amongst the Top 3 for the Vocal Ensemble competition at the Aarhus Vocal Festival. I. Was. Impressed. Needless to say, they won! Congrats!

6) Hot on the heels of this experience comes the MIX Masterclass with The Swingle Singers…great to see how Excellent can become Superb with a few tips on stage presence  and tuning from the experts. MIX blew me away with their intensity even without stage props, costumes and microphones. We will hear a lot more from them in the future.

7) Canadian party a cappella group Eh440 kept the audience entertained between the competition sets. They gave myself and Tone asylum in their car and we all sat singing Lionel Richie’s “All Night Long” in 6 improvised parts on our way to the SoJam After-Party #carjam and even took us in as VIPs! A cappella bonds…just like that!

8) A customised Vocal Jog for Dee around the Sheraton block with Florian Städtler between discussions about EVA and CASA in the quest for an elusive taxi to the North Carolina University campus for the workshops on Veterans’ Day…. an almost impossible task but we made it.

9) MICappella… Asian a cappella took the stage by storm last Saturday. Not only are these guys cool to hang out with, their mix of Pop, Rock and Ballads interspersed with the dispersion of myths about Singapore … (They are neither in China, Malaysia  nor in Japan!!) , crowd approval gestures Asian style, a bass from hell, a mad beatboxer and strong vocalists catered for a fired up audience and good vibes all around. The modern day ” hold-up-your-flashlight-on-your-smartphone” during a chinese ballad was literally a brilliant moment for all.

10) And then came the Swingles. All of a sudden there was a refined, pure, clear, beautiful sound encompassing us all like a tunnel of light shining into a clearing in the forest. The bass and the vocal percussion were defining but non intrusive, balm for my ears… Sara Brimer’s soaring soprano, Clare Wheeler’s unbelievable scats, Oliver Griffiths soul- wrenching tenor, Jo Etson’s refined mezzo… I was moved to tears by the Swingles for the first time and I have seen the Swingles at least 4 times in the last 2 years. Their performance was a display of elite a cappella, aristocracy if you wish, hand picked and handed down over 50 years of the group’s existence. Yes, the Swingles totally own their art form!

PS.  Sunday morning brunch in Jimmy V’s … scrambled eggs, sausages and bacon, scones, bagels, fresh fruit and yoghurt and coffee served in a real cup for the first time in 5 days! How I had missed that. And no, I will not diverge into a German rant about Schwarzbrot but this brunch really compensated for all the fast food and coffee to go.. I could laugh and sing again!

Mit freundlichem Gruß

Deborah Rosanwo

 

From Europe with (Tough) Love

Deke Sharon

 

 

This post is a spontaneous response by Vocal Blog founder Florian Städtler to an outstanding article written by CASA founder Deke Sharon at www.casa.org yesterday. You can read the original post here and will find my reply. Comments would be very much appreciated.

 

 

Hi Deke,

it’s been a while since a vocal music blog post made me think so hard. Let me add a few thoughts from an outside perspective. Outside because a) I’ve been to the US only once (4 days of SoJam 2011), b) I’ve started my “a cappella career” rather late, i.e. when I was about 35 years old and c) as of today I’m making more than half of my money with events that have nothing to do with a cappella at all.

1) I fully agree to the theory of “1% inspiration, 99% perspiration”. Almost all outliers have spent the magic 10.000 hours of work on their very own domain.

2) This means neither becoming a complete nerd (in a negative sense) nor a burnout victim. I haven’t met Deke Sharon in person yet, but as far as I have heard he has a family, owns more than one book and is an exquisite chef.

3) Every community needs different types of members: There are the visionaries, that write “tough” blog posts. There are the dreamers, that inspire people around them with charisma and works of art. There are the busy buddies who can get away with an average of 5 hours sleep. And there are hidden champions who contribute to the growth of “the thing” by an endless number of little steps. You can choose, who you are and find your place.

4) Every art form and genre also needs a foundation of people who just do IT because they love it and others who form a professional elite (and hopefully love it, too). The pros wouldn’t be able to survive without the amateurs: They are the activistis who spread the news, buy tickets and download music. The amateurs are happy to have inspiring role models, efficient organizers and reliable managers that get things done.

5) At the center of this discussion lies the Big Q (as mentioned in my blog post only two days ago: http://vocalblog.acappellazone.com/2012/01/6-lessons-from-lacf-2012) Do you want to stay in this “a cappella bubble” with all these “nice people” who create “harmony for harmony” all the time? Or do you feel the urge to step outside, into the real world and connect with it, even if it may disappoint you more than one time?

Florian Städtler

6) Leaders become leaders mostly because they are able to step out of their comfort zones. Which means to work as hard as Deke described it. And also to look for discomforting evidence all the time, i.e. to not follow the natural impulse to see what’s already ingrained in your thinking. It also means to say the things that no one wants to hear. That’s why I particularly love Deke’s “Tough Love – Tough Market” post: It is provocative without being cynic. (The cynic is a disappointed person, who doesn’t want to be disappointed again).

7) We Europeans would wish their iron being nearly as hot as the US one is. We don’t have collegiate a cappella, Glee is just one of many tv shows and we don’t have The Sing-Off. We don’t have a single mass market and as if this wasn’t enough, most people are still not able to clap on 2 and 4… So making a professional a cappella career over here seems like a suicide mission. But wasn’t that even more futile in the early nineties, when a guy from the West Coast just started it all?

I’m pretty sure that the late 80s Deke Sharon was much too smart and realistic to PLAN his “a cappella career”. Nevertheless, he acted stubbornly and worked perpetually on what meant so much to him. If you read the biographies of Gates, Jobs, The Beatles, Einstein as well as those of every top sportsman, scientiest or musician, they have some things in common: They followed the 10.000 hour rule, they were at the right place at the right time (maybe just by keeping to work on their thing for so long?) and they had the necessary talent.

Can we plan these kind of careers? Certainly not. But it’s good to have a tough benchmark. And a very nice role model. Thanks, Deke for giving us both.

// FSt – Florian Städtler // www.vocal-blog.net, founder // www.europeanvoices.net , co-founder, Chairman of the Board // www.acappellazone.com, co-founder //

// phone: +49 761 38 94 74  // e-mail: info@vocal-blog.net //

Deke’s “Tough Love” post has led to some interesting replies by peer bloggers, find the links to related articles here:

Jan 15 Vocal Blog – Florian Städtler „6 Lessons from LACF 2012“

Jan 16 CASA – Deke Sharon „Tough Love – Tough Market“ including comments by Peter Hollens, Willy Eteson, Florian Städtler et.al.

Jan 17 Vocal Blog – Florian Städtler “From Europe with (Tough) Love”  including comments by Mark Gregory, RJ Eckhart, Deke Sharon, Willy Etson et.al.

Jan 17 Acatribe – David Bernstein „Calling Out ‚Professional‘ Groups“

Jan 17 RJ A Cappella – Robert-Jon Eckhart „The Big Q“

Jan 19 CASA – Deke Sharon „So What Can I Do?“

Florian Städtler is founder Vocal Blog and Chairman of the European Voices Association. He can’t believe how quickly this blog has developed a following of wonderful, intelligent and nicely-smelling people. Thanks for sharing the greatest ideas and the latest aca-gossip with a growing number of vocal music enthusiasts. If you can’t get enough of this stuff and/or want to get in touch with almost 1000 a cappella buddies like Vocal Blog on Facebook. If you want to make us of Vocal Blog as a filter and aggregator of a cappella news, links, tipps and hilarious tweets, follow Vocal Blog on Twitter.

If you want to sell and/or buy stuff online, go to Acappellazone or write to florian@acappellazone.com. If you think there is a video of high quality of exceptional artistry, let us know so that we can post it on the Acappellazone YouTube channel.

If you like face-to-face communication (like 4-hour candle light dinners or after party allnighters), I agree: This is the best way to communicate. So let’s stay in touch via social media and meet in person when Vocal Blog goes on tour: See you in Stockholm!

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6 Lessons from LACF 2012

by Florian Städtler on BA 753 from London Heathrow to Basel/Freiburg

London A Cappella Festival was a blast: A growing audience, a buzzing venue, an international line-up and an impressive number of vocal music movers and shakers from places as far as Taipeh, Toronto and Torino. The sheer joy of three days packed with concerts by some of the top artists of the genre, enthusiastic youngsters meeting the pros and the encounters with all those wonderful aca-family members rings on while the 2012 festival is over.

Any event that really meant something to us, leaves us with a kind of post-festival nostalgia, maybe a little hangover and the occasional farewell-miss-you-hope-to-see-you-all-again tweets and status updates. But it also leaves us with a lot of homework if we want to avoid telling this one favourite musicians’ lie: “Let’s do something together!” (The others are: “I’ll never drink again” – “I’ll give you the money back tomorrow” – “I really liked your solo” – “I’ll call you next week” etc.).  So here’s the lessons and the points of action that from my point of view will make London A Cappella Festival 2012 not only a temporary firework of musicality, expertise and camraderie but a step towards the development of our community including the occasional look outside the a cappella bubble, i.e. “the real world”:

  1. Education   There is an enormous demand from teachers, music teachers and even business consultants for tools that can help to improve music education as well as the development of social skills in all domains. Singing together is an immensely effective tool and our community has both the capability and the duty to make this tool accessible to as many people as possible.
  2. Face-to-Face Communication  The vocal music festival as a combination of concerts, educational events and social activities is the heart and soul of the community. It must be the goal to create ANNUAL events in as many countries, regions and cities as possible. And these events can start very small – it can take years to grow an audience, to find collaborators and to get heard in the media. Meeting people in person will always be the best, so bring on the a cappella events!
  3. Internationality   Our knowledge of how to improve and innovate is naturally limited. Some call it tunnel vision, some blame the daily grindstone. But only if we continually try to get a different, a somehow external perspective, we will truly improve and develop both the art form and the business models. We are lucky to already have established transcontinental communication and invitations, but now let’s turn it into concrete collaboration.
  4. Infrastructure   We now have three organisations covering Planet A Cappella: CASA (The Contemporary A Cappella Society) was founded on the US West Coast by the godfather of US vocal music, Deke Sharon in 1991. Due to 20 years of hard work and the latest mainstream media successes (Glee, Sing-Off, Straight No Chaser) CASA is stronger than ever and has developed attractive programs for approximately 600 members and 10.000 CASA account holders all over the US of A Cappella. Vocalasia was founded less than two years ago and their track record in China, Korea, Japan, Singapore and Taiwan is impressive to say the least. And by December 2012, EVA (The European Voices Association) has begun to work on the collaboration of existing organizations in more than 25 EU member countries. The first informal talks between the representatives of the organisations were very promising. They left us with the homework to make exchange of know-how and talent an ongoing, structured process.
  5. Out of the Comfort Zone   It’s quite cosy in the a cappella bubble, isn’t it? So full of festival-triggered endorphine, why would we want to change a thing at all? Let me tell you why: Because what we have seen yet, could be only the tip of the iceberg. What if Deke Sharon’s vision of an annual a cappella event “no farther than 2 hours drive from every US citizen” came true? What if Clare Chen‘s plan to open up the Chinese mainland market for international a cappella became reality? What if Peder Karlsson’s Real Academy was the vocal music educational web hub of Europe, Asia and the US? What if there was a single platform for worldwide a cappella resources and information? All these ideas are worthless….as long as we’re only talking about them. We need more people who really get things done. And getting things done means leaving the personal comfort zone: Raise money, cut red tape, lobby for your cause, make this unpleasant phone call.
  6. The Big Q was already mentioned above: A Cappella Coocoon vs. Dream of the Mainstream. As a cappella mentor Peder Karlsson said, “if you asked a taxi driver, he won’t be able to tell you the name of any vocal group”. Do we want this to change? Or would this destroy the a cappella family? And why not search for the Big A: The way to combine commercial success and community bliss? Let’s make this our common homework.

This blog post and

Deke’s “Tough Love” post has led to some interesting replies by peer bloggers, find the links to related articles here:

Jan 15 Vocal Blog – Florian Städtler „6 Lessons from LACF 2012“

Jan 16 CASA – Deke Sharon „Tough Love – Tough Market“ including comments by Peter Hollens, Willy Eteson, Florian Städtler et.al.

Jan 17 Vocal Blog – Florian Städtler “From Europe with (Tough) Love”  including comments by Mark Gregory, RJ Eckhart, Deke Sharon, Willy Etson et.al.

Jan 17 Acatribe – David Bernstein „Calling Out ‚Professional‘ Groups“

Jan 17 RJ A Cappella – Robert-Jon Eckhart „The Big Q“

Jan 19 CASA – Deke Sharon „So What Can I Do?“

Florian Städtler is founder Vocal Blog and Chairman of the European Voices Association. He can’t believe how quickly this blog has developed a following of wonderful, intelligent and nicely-smelling people. Thanks for sharing the greatest ideas and the latest aca-gossip with a growing number of vocal music enthusiasts. If you can’t get enough of this stuff and/or want to get in touch with almost 1000 a cappella buddies like Vocal Blog on Facebook. If you want to make us of Vocal Blog as a filter and aggregator of a cappella news, links, tipps and hilarious tweets, follow Vocal Blog on Twitter.

If you want to sell and/or buy stuff online, go to Acappellazone or write to florian@acappellazone.com. If you think there is a video of high quality of exceptional artistry, let us know so that we can post it on the Acappellazone YouTube channel.

If you like face-to-face communication (like 4-hour candle light dinners or after party allnighters), I agree: This is the best way to communicate. So let’s stay in touch via social media and meet in person when Vocal Blog goes on tour: See you in Stockholm!

10 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Miss LACF

by Florian Städtler, Vocal Blog

with Clare Wheeler at LACF 2011

 

Who needs reasons to go to an international a cappella festival in London anyway…? Nevertheless, as this will be my third London A Cappella Festival (LACF), I feel that I might add something to the pre-festival excitement. And maybe make the undecided change their calendars if necessary, persuade the boyfriend (who’s into Heavy Metal) to come along and buy one pair of shoes less (sorry, Clare Wheeler, Tine Fris and Alyusha Chagrin) to buy tickets for the LACF concerts and workshops.

  1. The Swingle Singers: I’m lucky to work with 8 of the best international vocal music acts. But it all started with the Swingles in 2002. And they started London A Cappella Festival. Love you all, you’re my heroes, Sara, Jo, Clare, Oli, Tobi, Kevin and CJ!
  2. The main line-up: FORK (FIN), Cadence (CAN), The Boxettes (UK), The Swingle Singers (guests: Euphonism from NYC) as well as the Vasari Singers, Cottontown Chorus and The London Vocal Project
  3. The free events: Kings Place is a fantastic place to meet and enjoy the company of the aca-family. The foyer stage will present dozens of free performances including reason no. 4…
  4. The Single Singers: This project is a kind of all-star-all-fun-international-virtual-becomes-real vocal group founded by two Dutch singers, Annemarie Homan and Emily May ‘t Hoen. Can you imagine twenty people from ten different countries meeting at LACF to perform their first public concert after only having met (in person) a few hours before? Check out The Single Singers’ blog and don’t miss their performance after the Saturday concert.
  5. The Vocal Jog: Since I’ve been travelling the vocal music world, I always ran – to see at least a bit of the cities I was staying. And due to serious after show parties and missing running gear, I almost always ended up as a solo Vocal Jogger. Morten Vinther, baritone with The Real Group was the first one who really joined me before TRG’s gig in my hometown Freiburg. But at LACF 2012, it looks as if we could beat this Vocal Jog world record! The LACF Vocal Jog 2012 will go ahead on Friday morning, January 13th, somewhere in the vicinity of Euston station. Stay tuned and check the news and details at the Vocal Blog Facebook fanpage.
  6. Educational Events: I could never really believe that a country like England with an incredibly rich choral history was actually an a cappella no man’s land. Thanks to people like Alex Godfree (Voice Festival UK) this is changing quickly.
  7. Acashirt Pictures: This is basically the first time after the launch of my vocal music online shop Acappellazone that I will see people wearing the brandnew “Acashirts”.  A few months ago we met designer Hans Weigel who created the most wonderful a cappella shirt designs. LACF is the first vocal music event who has its official festival shirt sold via Acappellazone. Looking so much forward to pictures of real people in acashirts!
  8. My US friends: It seems like yesterday, when I attended the mother of all US a cappella festivals, SoJam. During my 4-day stay with The Boxettes I met so many fantastic, friendly and talented people, I won’t even begin to give any names here. But I particularly like the fact, that NYC-based group Euphonism will open for the Swingles on Saturday. Safe trip over the pond!
  9. London: is simply my favourite town ever. I’ve been an England fan since I went there with my family in the 70s: Devon cream tea, fish & chips, the Channel ferries, the Cornwall coast. And a two-hours pub stay with my good friend Costa Peristianis (his agency Ikon Arts runs LACF) in October in a most wonderful place called “The Antelope” confirmed my belief that better sooner than later I have to find a way to work at least 3-4 days a month in “The Big Smoke”.
  10. Global A Cappella: One mission in London is to make more movers & shakers (as well as vocal music fans and singers) mark the next super-event in their calendars: The Real Vocal Festival hosted by another European vocal music icon, The Real Group, will go ahead in Sweden’s capital Stockholm from August 16th-19th. Performances by The Real Group, Rajaton, The Swingle Singers, Postyr Project, Vocado a sensational educational programme curated by Peder Karlsson’s Real Academy and – working on it – a meeting of the leaders of CASA (The Contemporary A Cappella Society), EVA (The European Voices Association) and Vocalasia will make TRVF a must-attend-event. Let’s talk about it in London.

Aren’t that reasons to get excited? So get ready for London, tell all your singing or vocal music loving friends to go there. How often has such kind of intense festival experience changed the spirit and the motivation of whole ensembles: There’s nothing like the common experience of both the best artists on stage and the “backstage” moment of talking to the same people in a workshop, listening, learning and laughing while joining this basic need of all human beings: Singing together in a group.

London A Cappella – here we come!

Florian Städtler is founder and chief blogger for Vocal Blog and Chairman of the Board of the recently founded European Voices Association. He is a very lucky guy knowing so many talented and inspiring people who contribute to what seems to become a vocal music movement. His motto: Let’s keep suprising each other!

Thanks for following Vocal Blog on Twitter and liking, sharing, posting on Facebook. And check out Acappellazone, too.

SoJam inside: Mark Hines talks.

30. September 2011 Keine Kommentare

SoJam A cappella Festival’s executive producer Mark Hines interviewed by Florian Städtler

Even with The Sing-off getting a lot of attention from both mainstream media and the aca-blogosphere, one question can be heard more often and more loudly: “Isn’t it November yet?” As a synonym for “CAN NOT WAIT!” this phrase tells us: Something big is going to happen on November 11-13 in Durham, North Carolina. An event that causes excitement all over the vocal music scene of the USA. And as I will have the privilege to join my US friends at THE USA’s a cappella festival highlight, I thought I had to speak to the head of the team that makes SoJam possible: Mark Hines, the festival’s executive producer.

VB: Great to have one of the true movers and shakers of US a cappella on the phone. Hi Mark, where are you right now?

Mark Hines: I’m here at SoJam Productions in North Carolina and we just had a conference call with the festival team. And all looks pretty good: The classes are set, tickets sales are coming in and it looks as if we might be sold out again this year which would mean record attendance.

VB: That sounds fantastic. But before talking about all the great things ahead in Durham, NC, we would like to learn a bit more about our interviewee. Who is Mark Hines and what does he do besides SoJam?

Mark Hines: Well, right now I don’t  feel that I’m doing much anything besides SoJam (laughs). I actually work a full-time job with a good friend of mine doing home audio and video productions and I’m also an a cappella music producer with Vocal Company and Nick Lyons – so there’s a lot of work to do right now.

VB: Probably 80-hour weeks for you, with the festival coming up. You are the festival’s executive producer – what does this practically mean, what is your job in the SoJam team?

Mark Hines: The festival is run through approximately hundred google documents, which are the starting point for many of our activities. What I actually do – for example in our phone calls – is to steer the boat, set up the itinerary for the conference call and then have lead the discussion with members like Kristin LoBiondo, Jennifer Fiduccia, Ben Stevens, Dave Sperandio. Of course we have everyone talk about where we are and adress the issues that we talked about the week before – we basically make sure that we’re all on the same page.

VB: CASA, the Contemporary A Cappella Society seems to play a big role in the development of the community in general and the festival in particular. How important is CASA for SoJam?

Mark Hines: CASA is extremely important for SoJam and the community. I would say, that CASA is certainly the reason that SoJam is at the level it is today. We started SoJam with the AACI, The Alliance for A Cappella Initiatives,  but joined forces with CASA in 2008. Since then CASA has such a thorough reach and all kinds of ressources that we weren’t accustomed to.

VB: From the external perspective it is really amazing that according to all sources, the whole SoJam team consists of volunteers. How can this work out resulting in a line-up and workshop programme of that quality?

Mark Hines: You know, that’s a really good question…I’m not really sure what it is that drives us. We just love what we do and it’s so great to see all these people come and interact with the stars of the a cappella scene. It’s fun and it’s exciting, it’s just that thrill that makes us all come together and live a weekend of our a cappella dreams.

VB: Let’s have a look at the festival’s programme. What’s new and what’s special about SoJam 2011?

Mark Hines: Mmh, new and special. Let’s start with The Boxettes: We think they are really special and we are very excited to have them this year. From a curricular standpoint, we have so many courses, e.g. vocal percussion, how to act on stage and the whole festival just gets bigger and bigger and better. We have a new technical producer we’re really excited about, the sound system should be pretty awesome. Bringing back Naturally 7 I guess is not new but for sure it’s exciting. And of course we have some new things that I can’t speak of yet…some suprises for the SoJam fans.

VB: For those who don’t have tickets yet, can you sum up the most important reasons to come to SoJam?

Mark Hines: Why you should go to SoJam? Well, I would say in the US it is the quintessential a cappella festival: We kind of borrowed good things from festivals of the past, put all the good things together and that’s how we got this unique festival. For tickets, go to www.sojam.net and note that most of the tickets both for concerts and workshops are limited, we only have limited space in the venues and tickets will certainly sell out in the next two to three weeks.

VB: So people of the US of A (and of course from elsewhere in the world, too), go to the SoJam website and book your trip to the festival. Mark, is there anything that you want to tell our readers, something the a cappella world should know about your festival?

Mark Hines: There would be so many thing to say – it’s hard to put my finger on just one thing. If you’re reading this and are interested in helping out, getting involved and being a part of this absolutely amazing festival team that we have here at CASA, feel free to contact me or anyone in the SoJam team. And of course, we at CASA got a lot of other cool festivals coming up, too: We got one in L.A., we got one in Boston – festivals are sprouting up so we are happy to get in touch with people who want to help us out organising these events.

VB: Mark, thank you very much for taking the time – great having you! I’m really looking forward to meeting you in person in less than 7 weeks from now.

Do you want to learn more about one of the greatest a cappella festivals on earth? Then go to www.sojam.net or even better go to Durham in November. You can be pretty sure to meet the most exciting bunch of a cappella enthusiasts you can imagine. And I would be happy to meet you there in person – just let me know that you are coming and when to meet up via Facebook or Twitter. C U @ SoJam!

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